The Wound Site

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Commonly asked questions

What should I know about my stitches?

There are a variety of ways to close a wound after surgery. By far the most common is to use sutures or stitches and, after any kind of abdominal surgery, you are likely to find stitches, even in a puncture wound from keyhole surgery. It is most likely that your stitches are dissolvable but occasionally stitches that need to be removed are still used. Surgical glue is a common alternative.

If you are not sure what your stitches are made of and weren’t told whether you had to get them removed or if they will dissolve on their own, call the hospital ward that treated you and they should tell you. Dissolvable stitches are supposed to dissolve on their own between about 10 and 21 days after surgery but, unfortunately, sometimes don’t dissolve.

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What if my dissolvable stitches do not dissolve?

Dissolvable stitches are supposed to dissolve on their own between about 10 and 21 days after surgery but, unfortunately, sometimes don’t dissolve. If after 21 days they are still there and you have been soaking in the bath (preferably) or showering, then you should contact the practice nurse at your surgery and ask them to perform a wound check and remove them for you.

Removing a stitch takes a second and is relatively painless. You should never pull at them yourself as this can result in complications such as a wound infection. If you think your stitches are stuck, when soaking in the bath you can wipe firmly over them with a clean damp flannel, once each in a north, south, east and west direction but be careful to do no more than that.

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Do I have stitches inside me?

If you had a major abdominal operation, yes you do. These stitches will dissolve on their own and you are unlikely to be aware of them. It will take between four to six weeks to knit the muscles together in the same way a wound on the surface of the skin does after a few days. This is one of the key reasons you should be taking it easy and not lifting anything for six weeks after surgery.

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I do not have stitches. What do I need to know?

There are other ways of closing a wound after surgery. Clips and staples need to be removed by a nurse or doctor and you are normally given an appointment before you leave or have them removed before you leave hospital. Sometimes the wound will be sprayed with a special adhesive that seals the skin. This kind of dressing has different names but you might hear it called “opsite” dressing or plastic skin. It is a liquid plastic that sets when sprayed on to the skin and comes into contact with the air. This wears off after a few days.

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Can I take a shower or bath following surgery?

Normally, you can shower 24 hours after an operation on your abdomen (tummy) and take a bath after 48 hours. It is a good idea to make sure someone is around when you get into the bath, in case you find it uncomfortable or tricky to get out. If for some reason it is not advisable to take a bath, you will usually be told this as part of your discharge information. If you are in any doubt, ring the ward from which you were discharged and ask them.

Whilst you have an open wound or stitches, you should avoid using bath oils or other strongly scented bath treats. Until the wound is healed and the stitches are gone, warm water and very gentle soap are all you should be using for your bathing needs. Other than a daily shower or bath, there should be no need to clean your wound with anything else. You should not use any antiseptic or cream type preparations on a new scar unless it has been prescribed by a doctor. Don’t rub or wash the scars; gentle washing in warm water with a mild soap or body wash gel, avoiding the actual scars, is all that is needed. Dissolvable stitches often rely on taking regular baths to help the stitches dissolve.

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Should I put a plaster on my wounds?

It is better to leave the wound site uncovered. However, if the stitches pull or rub on your clothing then covering them with some low adherent dressing (that does not stick to the skin), which is available from most pharmacies and supermarkets, is recommended. You should not use any antiseptic or cream type preparations on a new scar unless it has been prescribed by a doctor.

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When will my wounds have healed?

As a general rule you should expect the wound to be clean and dry with no evidence of weeping after 10 days. If you are in any doubt about your wound site, ask your doctor or practice nurse to take a look.

Once the skin has healed, the scar can look quite raised and red for some weeks and months. This is not unusual and, although hard to believe at the start, it will fade with time from red to pink and then eventually to a silvery white and become almost unnoticeable. As long as the wound site is comfortable, does not become sore to touch, does not begin to feel warmer than the surrounding skin and remains closed then you can be confident the wound is healed.

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I have bruising. Is this normal?

After surgery, it is not uncommon for the area below your tummy button right down in to your pubic hair line to be very bruised. The bruising can be very noticeable indeed. However, it is usually not anything to worry about and gradually fades over about six weeks.

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Is there likely to be scar tissue inside me and will this affect my future chances?

After any abdominal operation, there is often some scar tissue or adhesions. An adhesion is scar tissue that binds two parts of your tissue together that should ordinarily remain separate. It may appear inside the body as a thin sheet of tissue similar to plastic wrap or as thick fibrous bands. The tissue develops when the body’s repair mechanisms respond to any tissue disturbance, such as surgery, infection, trauma, or radiation.

Although adhesions can occur anywhere, the most common locations are within the abdomen, the pelvis, and the heart. Abdominal adhesions are a common complication of surgery, occurring in up to 93% of people who undergo abdominal or pelvic surgery and even in 10.4% of people who have never had surgery. Adhesions typically begin to form within the first few days after surgery. Often, they produce no symptoms at all.

The abdominal scars should make no difference to your future chances of having a baby. The Fallopian tube that was operated on may have been removed, or at least damaged, from the operation but pregnancy is usually achieved through the other Fallopian tube anyway irrespective of whether or not the affected Fallopian tube was salvaged. Sometimes, adhesions form in the abdomen as a result of surgery and these can occasionally compromise the remaining Fallopian tube, but only time will tell. Even so, overall, 65% of women are pregnant again within 18 months of an ectopic pregnancy and some studies suggest that 85% are pregnant after two years.

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Get in touch

If you or someone you know needs support with an ectopic pregnancy, please feel free to contact us.

Other pages you might find helpful

Click here to find answers to questions you have on post ectopic pregnancy pain

Click here to find answers to questions regarding other symptoms you may be feeling post ectopic pregnancy

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